Maera

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  • Titles: Mistress of Magic, Threadspinner, the White Eye, Nightwatcher, Concealer of Secrets.
  • Aspects: Magic (in all forms), mystery, divination, occult matters.
  • Symbol: A half moon (silver and black halves) emblazoned with the symbol for infinity in the reverse colors of the background.
  • Priesthood: Order of the Waxing Sickle (priests); Order of the Waning Sickle (paladins).
  • Herald: A cowled figure, with robes decorated with symbols of all types of mage.
  • Holy Day: Every Monandaeg.
  • Duties: Maintain the magical fields, protect relics.
  • Sins:
    • (Minor) destroying a temporary relic (using it does not count as destroying), not welcoming the moon
      each night, not casting a spell at least once a day, aiding others in permanently weakening a mage’s ability to work magic;
    • (Major) permanently weakening a mage’s ability to work magic, failure to follow up a lead regarding a permanent relic;
    • (Mortal) destroying a permanent relic.
  • Signature Power: Dispel.
  • Powers: Arcane resistance, banish, barrier, bolt, defl ection, detect/conceal, elemental manipulation, energy immunity, ethereal/corporeal, fly, glyph, light, negate arcana, obscure, precognition, sanctuary, stun, summon elemental, summon herald, teleport, warding.
  • Trappings: Clergy may use any type of trapping.

Maera is the goddess of magic, personified by the moon, whose pale light affects the flow of magic in the world. Most mages, regardless of their art, worship her, for they are all affected by her waxing and waning. Her image is that of a cowled woman, holding a small loom in her left hand and a sphere (representing the moon) in her right hand.

Shrines to Maera are rare outside of magician’s domiciles, though some settlements worship her lunar aspect. Temples are depositories of magical knowledge, well warded by glyphs and protected by paladins against raids by thieves, Justiciaries, and Reliquae. At the center of every temple is an open chamber where rituals are conducted by moonlight. Many temples have taken to installing glass roofs, allowing the moonlight access, but thwarting would-be intruders (and the inclement weather). Such are the times in which men now live.

Her priests worship the raw magical energy of the world, not the individual strands of magic mages so adore. In return, she grants her disciples the ability to work any spell, though not as well as a specialist mage. Many of her clerics are alchemists, spending their days creating temporary magic items.

Paladins of the faith hire themselves out as bodyguards to those with a distrust of magic or who have reason to fear magical assault. They also explore old ruins in search of lost magic, returning it to their temple. Naturally, this puts them at odds with both the Justiciary and the Reliquary, and violent confrontations are quite common.

Maera’s festivals take the form of mystery plays, seemingly gibberish recitations. All prayers and hymns used in festivals are secret, their meaning hidden from the eyes and ears of the laity. Some ceremonies involve divination,
which can take one of many forms. Although the use of cards or rune stones are the most common, dreams, the weather, flight of birds, residue left in herbal brews, the ripples caused by drops of water, and so on are all used.

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Maera

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