Karmelos

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  • Titles: Champion of the Gods, General of the Heavenly Armies, The Supreme General, Honorable Victor, Warmonger.
  • Aspects: Battle, courage, war, honor, strategy.
  • Symbol: A scimitar dripping with blood.
  • Priesthood: Advisors (priests); Scimitars (paladins).
  • Herald: A lion headed warrior carrying a great scimitar (use the stats for a herald of Tiw from the Hellfrost Bestiary).
  • Holy Day: Every Yaus al-Nefar during Alak Shemu.
  • Duties: To fight with bravery and honor, lead armies to victory, protect those who seek your aid.
  • Sins: (Minor) showing mercy to an inferior foe, being beaten in combat by an equal or superior foe; (Major) fleeing a fight against an inferior opponent, being beaten in combat without good cause; (Mortal) surrendering without a fight.
  • Signature Power: Armor (Strategist) or smite (Scimitars).
  • Powers: Aim, arcane resistance, armor, barrier, battle song, bladebreaker, blast, bodyguard, bolt, boost/ lower trait (Spirit, Strength, Vigor, Fighting, Knowledge (Battle), Riding, Shooting, and Throwing), burst, champion of the faith, deflection, energy immunity, fatigue, gift of battle, knockdown, prolonged blast, quickness, sluggish reflexes, sanctuary, smite, speed, stun, summon herald, warrior’s gift, weapon immunity.
  • Trappings: Clergy may use any trapping except a necromantic one.

Karmelos is the god of warriors and generals alike, granting his faithful the power to lead men into battle and to deliver crushing defeats to individual foes. Virtually anyone who has to fight pays lip service to Karmelos at some point, though the nomads place Karmelos below Duamutef when it comes to warfare. Karmelos is shown as a warrior with six arms, each bearing a different weapon. He often has the head of a lion, a symbol of ferocity, courage, and honor.

Shrines can be static or mobile. Static ones are commonly found in guard barracks or military forts, and typically stand alongside carvings displaying the names of those fallen in battle from the building. This serves as a reminder of their sacrifice, and ensures their names are never forgotten. Mobile ones usually take the form of a war banner or some sort of sacred weapon, and are carried with the army, serving as a rallying point in battle. Temples stand in most cities. The presence of a heavily armed, well-trained, organized army inside the city walls worries most rulers, and so temples are forced to be small affairs, housing just a few sleeping chambers, a mess hall, an armory, a few workshops, and a training room. Usually the city barracks is located nearby, just in case a rebellion occurs. To date, no cleric of Karmelos has led a rebellion against a just ruler.

Usually, but not always, priests tend to follow the strategic aspect of Karmelos, acting as military advisors to generals and nobles. Paladins are much more inclined to take the hands on approach and join in with the troops. Neither type actively goes out looking for meaningless violence, for
Karmelos is not a god of thugs. Once diplomacy has failed, however, there can be only one outcome—combat.

Ceremonies often take the form of ritual combats to first blood (though death has been known to occur). Sometimes these combats are scripted combats, tales of Karmelos’ struggles against his demonic foes. Other times they are free-for-alls. Weapons are frequently sacrificed to the god of war by being bent or broken. It is believed such sacrifices go to arm the god’s divine army and thus aid in the eternal struggle against Iblis’ legions.

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Karmelos

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